How is the memory accessed on the 3514 and the 5104 synchronous serial adapters?

  The Zilog 16C32-based 3514 and 5104 have 256 K of memory on the adapters that are used for buffering the input and output data. To aid in transfer efficiency, the Windows SeaMAC V5 driver conducts 32-bit transfers from the adapters’ memory to the system memory until there are less than four bytes to transfer. […]

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How will my Sealevel synchronous serial adapter appear in Windows Device Manager?

  In Windows Device Manager, Sealevel synchronous serial adapters will install under the ‘SeaMAC Device’ category. The device names for Sealevel synchronous serial adapters, with part numbers in parenthesis, are shown as they appear in Device Manager. PCI Synchronous Serial Adapters ‘4 Port Synchronous-Capable Serial Adapter (5402)’ ‘High Speed Multi Protocol Serial PCI Adapter (5104)’ […]

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Is synchronous mode the only mode that can use a BERT pattern?

  Section 2.5 of the ITU O.151 document basically states that a pattern can be encapsulated by the framing bits of a protocol, if necessary. Therefore, the BERT pattern can be used in a synchronous mode, such as SDLC/HDLC, as well as asynchronous mode.  

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What bit order does the Zilog 16C32 chipset use for transmitting serial data?

  The Z16C32 operates similar to a UART and transmits the least significant bit first. The only exception is when the card is operating in SDLC/HDLC mode with CRC enabled. The CRC is transmitted most significant bit first and all other serial data is transmitted least significant bit first.

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What clocking modes do Sealevel synchronous serial adapters support?

  Sealevel synchronous serial adapters support the three most common non-encoded clocking modes: The Sealevel serial adapter provides the clock using the baud rate generator (BRG) that will be used by the other serial device for transmitting and receiving. The other device provides an external clock that the Sealevel serial adapter will use for transmitting […]

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What is a CRC in synchronous serial communications?

  The Cyclic Redundancy Check (CRC) is a check value used to detect transmission errors in a frame or block of data. The transmitter encodes the calculated CRC value and appends it to the data transmitted. The receiver decodes the calculated CRC value and compares it to the received data. Errors in the CRC indicate […]

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What is the difference between ‘Set Configuration’ or ‘Save Configuration’ in WinSSD?

  The ‘Set Configuration’ and ‘Save Configuration’ buttons are only available in the synchronous version of WinSSD test utility that is included in the SeaMAC software suite. Clicking the ‘Set Configuration’ button will send the configuration currently defined in this window to the SeaMAC driver. If successful, it will cause the driver to be configured […]

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